Category Archives: Scope and Sequence

Canadian History Scope and Sequence


1 – First Nations


 


2 – European Explorers


 


3 – Early Settlements and First Colonies


 


4 – New France


Biography – Samuel de Champlain


 


5 – New France, Indian Wars


 


6 – New France, Voyageurs


Biography – Pierre de LaVerendrye


 


7 – Acadia


 


8 – Seven Years’ War


Biography – General Montcalm


 


9 – Canadian British Colonies


 


10 – Pioneers and Colonies


 


11 – War of 1812


Biography – General Isaac Brock


Biography – Tecumseh


 


12 – Rebellion of 1837


 


13 – Immigration


 


14 – Underground Railroad


 


15 – The Metis and the Buffalo


 


16 – Opening of the West


 


17 – Western Settlers and Aboriginal Lands


Biography – Maskepetoon


 


18 – Arctic Exploration


 


19 – Confederation


Prime Minister – John A. Macdonald


 


20 – Fenian Uprising, Riel Rebellion


Biography – Louis Riel


 


21 – Klondike Gold Rush


Biography – Martha Munger


 


22 – Life in the 1800s


 


23 – A New Era, Turn-of-the Century


Biography – L.M. Montgomery


Biography – Nellie McClung


 


24 – World War One


 


25 – Changing Times


 


26 – The Great Depression


 


27 – World War Two


 


28 – Cold War, Oil Boom


Biography – Farley Mowat


 


29 – Quebec Nationalism and First Nations


 


30 – Canadian Achievement and Equal Rights


 

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Choosing Your Path


Families and schools vary in their preferences for sequencing work in science and history. This article outlines several possibilities for planning the sequence of your studies using Task Card Sets from Creek Edge Press.

If you scroll down this
page you will see a link to our catalog where you will find detailed
descriptions of each Task Card Set. These will help you understand how the cards may be used at various stages. Over time, the standard required in your student’s response is increased and students use more detailed materials to complete the tasks as they mature. During the grammar stage, students naturally focus on major figures, events, and basic vocabulary. Dialectic students use in-depth materials that encourage understanding of broad themes and patterns.

Most families prefer to study one era of history each year (or term). This focus provides a shared experience among the students and eases the burden of preparation. It isn’t always practical to plan a prepared environment for more than one subject in science, but some families prefer to have several sets going at once for various levels. The following lists details possible plans for one student.



K – Geography and Culture and simple nature study for science

1 – Ancient World and Life Science

2 – Medieval World and Earth and Space

3 – Early Modern World and Physics and Digital Science

4 – Modern World and Chemistry and Great Scientists

5 – Geography and Culture and Ancient World (one semester each) and Life Science

6 – Medieval World and Earth and Space

7 – Early Modern World and Physics and Digital Science

8 – Modern World and Chemistry and Great Scientists



If you want to include a year for American History study, your schedule might look like this.



K – Geography and Culture and nature study

1 – American History and Life Science

2 – Ancient World and Earth and Space

3 – Medieval World and Physics and Digital Science

4 – Early Modern World and Chemistry and Great Scientists

5 – Modern World and Life Science

6 – Geography and Culture and Ancient World (one semester each) and Earth and Space

7 – Medieval World progressing into Early Modern and Physics and Digital Science

8 – Early Modern through Modern World and Chemistry and Great Scientists

Consider mapping out a plan for your oldest student and having the younger students fold in as able. There are many good options. Whatever your preference, you will find that your plan provides focus and eases your preparation. 


                                                    



 

Grammar Reinforcement Scope and Sequence




Grammar Reinforcement Task Card Set I


 


1 – Naming Words


2- Nouns Name People



3 – Common Nouns



4 – Proper Nouns


5 – Nouns name places


6 – Nouns name things


7 – Nouns name ideas


8 – Action Verbs


9 – State of Being Verbs
10 – Linking Verbs


11 – Helping Verbs


12 – Pronouns


13 – Adjectives describe nouns


14 – Adverbs describe verbs


15 – Adverbs describe adjectives


16 – Adverbs describe adverbs


17 – Articles


18 – Conjunctions


19 – Interjection


20 – Building Sentences, Naming Parts of Speech


 


Grammar Reinforcement Task Cards Set II


 


1 – Sentence Form


2 – Statements


3 – Commands


4 – Exclamations


5 – Questions


6 – Prepositions


7 – Synonyms



8 – Antonyms



9 – Homonyms


10 – Contractions


11 – Quotations


12 – Initials


13 – Using the pronoun I


14 – Titles of Respect


15 – Abbreviations


16 – Days of the Week


17 – Months of the Year


18 – Writing Dates


19 – Titles


20 – Poetry


21 – Paragraph Form


                                                                        




 

Art and Artists Scope and Sequence


Art and Artists Task Cards are comprised of three sets of student task cards.  They are meant to be used at a pace of about one per week and will take roughly three school years to complete.  The tasks direct students to engage with key content and activities that are accessible, engaging, and challenging for all ages.  Applied Art tasks are divided into two levels in Sections I and II.  Section III directs students to copy the work of master artists at their current level.  Students may repeat the complete course several times for maximum growth in understanding and artistic skill.  Many families find the Art Study tasks an ideal way to start the school day before beginning independent work. 

Section I:  Introduction to Art


1 – The Visual Arts, Local Art


2 – Painting: Two Dimensional, Story Art


3 – Painting: Paints, Color


4 – Painting: Landscapes, Seascapes


5 – Painting: Animals in Art


6 – Painting: Still Life


7 – Painting: Music, Play, and Sport in Art


8 – Painting: Contrast, Positive and Negative, Light and Dark


9 – Painting: People and Dancers in Art


10 – Painting: Portraits, Subject, Setting


11 – Painting: Self-Portraits


12 – Painting: Children and Families in Art


13 – Sculpture, Three Dimensional


14 – Sculpture, Terracotta Soldiers


15 – Sculpture, Olmec Heads


16 – Sculpture, Totem Pole


17 – Sculpture, Celtic Sundials


18 – Sculpture, Indian Rock Cut Caves


19 – Engraving


20 – Printmaking


21 – Metal Work


22 – Architecture, Structure, Aesthetics


23 – Architecture, Ishtar Gate


24 – Architecture, Egyptian Pyramids


25 – Architecture, Pantheon


26 – Architecture, Cathedral


27 – Architecture, Sydney Opera House


28 – Photography


29 – Film


30 – Animation


31 – Fashion and Interior Design


32 – Careers in Art


*Includes lessons and exploration using Drawing With Children and Keys to Drawing as well as projects related to art study. 
 


Section II Art History Survey


 


1 – Prehistoric Art, The First Paintings


2 – Prehistoric Art, Early Pottery


3 – Art of the Ancient World, Egyptian Tomb Art


4 – Art of the Ancient World, Indian Art


5 – Art of the Ancient World, Minoan and Mycenaean Art


6 – Art of the Ancient World, Greek Art


7 – Art of the Ancient World, Roman Art


8 – Early Christian Art


9 – Byzantine Art


10 – Gothic Art


11 – Italian Renaissance Art


12 – German Portraiture, The Northern Renaissance


13 – Mannerism, Northern Mannerism


14 – Northern Landscape


15 – Italian Catholic Art


16 – Flemish Baroque Art


17 – Spanish Baroque Art


18 – Golden Age of Dutch Painting


19 – Late Baroque, Rococo


20 – The British School


21 – Neo-Classicism, French Neo-Classicism


22 – Romantic Art


23 – Pre-Raphaelites


24 – Realism


25 – Toward Impressionism


26 – Impressionism


27 – Post Impressionism, Pointilism


28 – Fauvism


29 – Expressionism


30 – Cubism


31 – Abstract Expressionism


32 – Minimalism


33 – Pop Art


*Includes Ongoing Applied Art study using How to Teach Art to Children and Elements of Art and Design.



Section III Featured Artists


 


1 – Donatello


2 – Giovanni Bellini


3 – Titian


4 – Leonardo da Vinci


5 – Michelangelo


6 – Raphael


7 – Albrecht Durer


8 – Hans Holbein (the Younger)


9 – Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini


10 – Rembrandt van Rijn


11 – Peter Paul Rubens


12 – Johannes Vermeer


13 – Jean-Antoine Watteau


14 – Francisco Goya


15 – Edouard Manet


16 – Edgar Degas


17 – Claude Monet


18 – Pierre-Auguste Renoir


19 – Vincent Van Gogh


20 – Georges Seurat


21- Henri Matisse


22 – Wassily Kandinsky


23 – Marc Chagal
24 – Pablo Picasso
*Includes tasks directing students to copy works of these great artists using the Artistic Medium Chart included in the Introduction or projects of student’s choice found on-line or in recommended books. 

Music and Composers Scope and Sequence

Music and Composers Task Cards are comprised of three sets of student task cards. They are meant to be used at a pace of about one per week and will take roughly three to four school years to complete. The tasks direct students to engage with key content and activities that are accessible, engaging, and challenging for all ages. Students may repeat the complete course several times for maximum growth in understanding. Many families find the listning tasks an ideal way to start the school day before beginning independent work.

Music and Composer Task Card Sets are comprised of three sets of student task cards. 

Section I: Introduction to Music

1 – Elements of Music: Pitch
2 – Elements of Music: Rhythm
3 – Elements of Music: Tempo
4 – Elements of Music: Harmony
5 – Elments of Music: Notation
6 – Elements of Music: Dynamics
7 – Elements of Music: Instrumentation
8 – Musical Genres: Orchestral Music
9 – Musical Genres: Vocal Prodction
10 – Musical Genres: Vocal Music
11 – Musial Genres: Opera
12 – Musical Genres: Music and Dance
13 – Musical Genres: Blues, Spirituals, Swing, and Jazz
14 – Musical Genres: Popular Music, Rock and Roll, Musicals
15 – Global Music: Middle East and Africa
16 – Global Music: China and Japan
17 – Global Music: India and Indoneia
18 – Global Music: Latin America
19 – Global Music: American and European Folk Songs
20 – Young Artists
21 – Music Profession

Section II: Survey of Music History

Music in Ancient Times
Medival Music – Gregrian Chant, Plainsong
Medieval Music – Polyphony, Sacred and Secular Music
Medieval Music – Minstrels and Troubadours
Instruments in the Middle Ages
Early Notation
Renaissance – Court Music, Chansons, Madrigal, Printing
Music of the Reformation – Hymns, Chorales
Music of the Counter Reformation
History of String Instruments
History of Reed Instruments
History of the Horn and Valve
History of Keyboard Instruments
History of the Drum
Early Orchestras
Baroque Orchestra
Concerto Grosso
Basso Continuo
Baroque Opera
Oratorio – Recitative, Aria, Chorus
Baroque Suites
Baroque Organ Music
Baroque Violin Music
Classical Orchestra
String Quartet
Concerto
Sonata
Symphonies of the Classical Period
Opera during the Classical Period
Symphonic Development
Romantic Period – Waltz, Lieder, Art Songs
Symphonic Poems
Romantic Symphonies
Grand Opera
Nationalism and Music – United Kingdom, United States, Czechoslovakia,Finland, Norway, Germany, France, and Russia
Militay Music and Bands
Modern Music

Section III: Featurd Composers

Hildegard of Bingen
Guillaume de Machaut
Josquin de Prez
Giovanni Palestrina
Orlande de Lassus
Thomas Tallis
William Byrd
Carlo Gesualdo
Claudio Monteverdi
Heirich Schutz
Jean Baptiste Lully
Arangelo Corelli
Henry Purcell
Antonio Vivaldi
Johann Pachalbel
Dietrich Bustehude
Johann Sebastian Bach
Georg Frederic Handel
Joseph Haydn
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Ludwig van Beethoven
Franz Schubert
Niccolo Paganini
Felix Mendelssohn
Frederic Chopin
Pyotr Illyich Tcaikovsky
Johannes Brahams
Richard Wagner
Richard Strauss
Claude Debussy
George Gershwin
Samuel Barber
Igor Stravinsky
Sergei Prokofiev
Paul Hindemith
Benjamin Britten

Terms, Symbols, and Listening Objectives
Pitch
Rhythm (quarter note, eighth note, half note, dotted half note, whole note, rests)
Tempo (adagio, andante, moderato, allegro, presto)
Harmony (pedal tone, round, canon, fugue)
Notation (staff, bass clef, trebl cleff, muscal alphabet, notes on keyboard)
Dynamics (pianissimo, piano, mezzo piano, mezzo forte, forte, fortissimo)
Instrumetation (strings, winds, brass, percussion)
Musical Expression
Vocal Production
Choral Music (soprano, alto, tenor, bass)
Opera, Operetta
Music and Dance (folk music, minuet, ballet)
Modes
Improvisation
Ragas
Talas
Gamelan
Calypso
Unison
Plainsong
Polyphony
Basso Continuo
Chorale Tune
Ornamentation
Resonance
Crescendo and Diminuendo
Trill
Major and Minor
Musical Phrase
Motif
Aleotoric
Counterpoint
Dissonance
Canon, Fugue, Chaconne
Terraced Dynamics
Sequences
Cadences
Theme and Variations






American History Scope and Sequence

The American History Task Card set includes 33 cards and an Introduction to the course.  The cards may be used by students in grades K – 8 and are intended to be used at a pace of about one per week.  This course is comprehensive.  Tasks cover research, map work, summaries, time line work, biographical figures, and simple projects designed to reinforce learning.  Topics included on the cards follow.

1 – The First Americans, Native Americans

2- European Explorers and Conquest

3 – Early European Settlements

4 – American Colonies

5 – French and Spanish Colonies

6 – New England

7 – Colonial American Trade

8 – Colonial American Life

9 – Slavery in America

10 – The French and Indian War

11- Colonial Rebellion, The American Revolution Begins

12 – American Revolution, The Declaration of Independence

13 – American Revoution, Battles and Generals

14 – Articles of Confederation and the Continental Congress

15 – The Constitution of the United States

16 – The Federalist Years

17 – The War of1812

18 – The Industrial Revolution in America

19 – National Unity and Early Reformers

20 – Westward Expansion, Lewis and Clark

21 – Indian Removal, Seminole Wars

22 – The Gold Rush, The Pony Express

23 – The Alamo, War with Mexico

24 – Slavery in the South, Abolitionism

25 – North and South: A Nation Divided

26 – Civil War

27 – Civil War

28 – Railways and the Wild West

29 – Indian Wars and Homesteaders

30 – Big Business, Industry, and Inventios

31 – Immigration

32 – Progressive Era and the Spanish American War

33 – World War I

34 – Boom to Bust, Jazz Age, The Great Depression

35 – World War II

36 – The Cold War

37 – Civil Rights and the Space Race

38 – Vietnam War

39 – The End of the Cold War, Militants and Terrorists

40 – The Digital Age, Terrorism, Medical Advances

34 –

Ancient World Scope and Sequence

The Ancient World Task Card set includes 34 cards and an Introduction to the course.  The cards may be used by students in grades K – 8 and are intended to be used at a pace of about one per week. This course is comprehensive.  Tasks cover research, map work, summaries, time line work, biographical figures, and simple projects designed to reinforce learning.  Topics included on the cards follow.

1 – Archaeology

2 – Creation (Card may be set aside per your family’s preferences for historical study)


3 – Hunters and Gatherers, Nomads, Cave Dwellers


4 – Fertile Crescent


5 – Sumerians and Akkadians


6 – Nile River Valley


7 – Egypt’s Old Kingdom, Mummies, and Pharoahs


8 – Indus Valley


9 – Stonehenge and Early European Villages


10 – Minoans


11 – Mycenaens


12 – Early Babylonians


13 – Hittites


14 – Egypt’s Middle and New Kingdom, Egyptian gods


15 – Canaanites


16 – Sea Peoples


17 – Israelites


18 – Israelites (David and Solomon0


19 – Phoenicians


20 – Assyrians


21 – Babylonian Empire


22 – Medes and Persians


23 – Ancient China


24 – Ancient Africa


25 – Ancient India


26 – Greece, Sparta, and Athens


27 – Greek Gods, Pelopponnesian War, Homer, Alexander the Great


28 Ancient Arabia


29 – Native Americans


30 – Ancient Celts


31 – The Founding of Rome, Roman Warfare


32 – Roman Life, Roman Gods


33 – Jesus, Christianity, The Fall of Rome


34 – Wrap Up and Review